How to help the monarch butterfly now that it’s endangered

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INJURIES. THE MOTORBOAT TAKES OFF AFTER THE COLLISION.. THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY IS NOW CONSIDERED AN ENDANGERED SPECIES.. BUT THERE IS SOMETHING THAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP MONARCH BUTTERFLIES THRIVE DESPITE THE CHALLENGES. ACTION NEWS 8 JOURNALIST MICHELLE GILE HAS THE STORY. IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE SOME MONARCH BUTTERFLY POPULATIONS WITH THEIR RECOGNIZABLE ORANGE AND BLACK WINGS MAY SOON BE EXTINCT. IN CALIFORNIA ARE IN CONSTANT DECLINE. :22(SOT)SARAH SMITH- ROGER’S GARDENS HORTICULTURIST IN THE 80’S WE HAD OVER 10 MILLION. THE NORTH AMERICAN MONARCH ON THE ENDANGERED LIST WHO IS TWO STEPS AWAY FROM EXTINCTION. ;40 (SOT) DOUG YANEGA- UC RIVERSIDE ETYMOLOGIST MOSTLY DUE TO THE DESTRUCTION OF THEIR WINTERING HABITAT WHICH IS IN MEXICO AND THERE ARE PROBLEMS THEY WILL HAVE MAKING THE TRIP TO NORTH AMERICA AND BACK TO MEXICO AT THE END OF THE YEAR..THERE’S A LOT THEY HAVE TO EXECUTE IN TERMS OF THE GAUNTLET. AND THE ASCENIERE PROBLEM IS ANOTHER KEY PROBLEM, ACCORDING TO HORTICULTURIST SARAH SMITH AT ROGER’S GARDENS IN NEWPORT BEACH. (FOOL) SAVING THE MONARCH IS A HIGH PRIORITY HERE. (NATS) EDUCATING PEOPLE THAT THERE IS A RIGHT AND A WRONG KIND OF ASCELIN FOR THE GARDEN IS KEY TO NOT KILLING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES. (SOT) A SMALL MICROSCOPIC PROTOZEA THAT GROWS ON THE MILKWEED THAT ENJOYS THEM TO TAKE INTO THEIR BODY AND KILL THEM SO IT’S A PEST AND IT’S ALL BECAUSE WE HAVE BEEN PLANTING THE WRONG KIND OF MILKWIDS SINCE SO LONG. The prettiest tropical milkweed sold in bright colors..ORANGE, RED AND YELLOW IS A BIG NO NO..Native milkweed with creamy white O

How to help the monarch butterfly now that it’s endangered

The monarch butterfly was listed as an endangered species by international conservations on Thursday and is now one step closer to extinction. Over the past decade, the population has dropped by 22% to 72% worldwide. Monarchs east of the Rockies declined by 84% from 1996 to 2014. In the West, the population fell by 99.9%. The central coast is no stranger to the monarch butterfly. Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove are popular places where migrating butterflies stop as they fly north from October through March. Monarchs need places to rest their wings, drink flower nectar and lay their eggs on milkweed, may their baby central coast dwellers help the declining monarch population? Here’s what the National Wildlife Federation recommends: Help save the grasslands — America’s native grasslands are critically important to monarch butterflies. They offer both milkweed for monarch caterpillars as well as nectar plants for adult butterflies (and many other pollinators as well). Today, over 90% of native grasslands have been converted to cropland and development. Grasslands are disappearing faster than any other ecosystem in North America, and that’s a big problem for monarchs. Join NWF in the fight to save grasslands from monarch butterflies. Support Highway Habitat Corridor – NWF and USFWS are working to create a coalition of agricultural leaders and trucking organizations to plant milkweed and nectar plants along flyways monarchs and other important monarch breeding grounds along the major Midwest and Texas Corridors. Learn more about the Road Habitat Corridor Plan and how to support it. There are many species of milkweed in North America, so no matter where you live there is at least one species native to your area. You’ll be rewarded not just by knowing you’re making a difference, but by attracting monarchs to enjoy it. Find out what milkweeds are in your area. Do not use pesticides — Monarchs are insects and spraying with insecticides will kill them. Make a pledge to avoid spraying pesticides in your yard. Find out how to garden organically. Creating a Habitat for Monarchs—NWF’s Garden for Wildlife program can teach you how to turn any outdoor space into a complete monarch habitat. It is enough to provide food, water, shelter and places to raise the young. It all starts with what you plant, and you can create a habitat garden in your own backyard, at your office, at your church, or on the grounds of the local school. Entire communities are launching efforts to create monarch habitats. Learn how to create a wildlife-friendly garden.

The monarch butterfly was listed as an endangered species by international conservations on Thursday and is now one step closer to extinction.

Over the past decade, the population has dropped by 22% to 72% worldwide. Monarchs east of the Rockies declined by 84% from 1996 to 2014. In the West, the population fell by 99.9%.

The central coast is no stranger to the monarch butterfly. Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove are popular places where migrating butterflies stop as they fly north from October through March.

Monarchs need places to rest their wings, drink nectar from flowers and lay their eggs on milkweed, which their baby caterpillars eat.

How can Central Coasters help the declining monarch population? Here is what the National Wildlife Federation recommends:

  1. Help save the grasslands — America’s native grasslands are critically important to monarchs. They offer both milkweed for monarch caterpillars as well as nectar plants for adult butterflies (and many other pollinators as well). Today, over 90% of native grasslands have been converted to cropland and development. Grasslands are disappearing faster than any other ecosystem in North America, and that’s a big problem for monarchs. Join NWF in the fight to save the grasslands from monarch butterflies.
  2. Support the road habitat corridor – NWF and USFWS are working to create a coalition of agricultural leaders and trucking organizations to plant milkweed and nectar plants along monarch flyways and in other important monarch breeding grounds along major corridors in the Midwest and Texas. Learn more about the Road Habitat Corridor Plan and how to support it.
  3. Plant milkweed — You can customize the monarch rescue by planting milkweed in your yard or garden. There are many species of milkweed in North America, so no matter where you live there is at least one species native to your area. You’ll be rewarded not just by knowing you’re making a difference, but by attracting monarchs to enjoy it. Find out which milkweeds are in your area.
  4. Do not use pesticides — Monarchs are insects, so spraying with insecticides will kill them. Make a pledge to avoid spraying pesticides in your yard. Find out how to garden organically.
  5. Create a monarch habitat— NWF’s Garden for Wildlife program can teach you how to turn any outdoor space into a complete monarch habitat. It is enough to provide food, water, shelter and places to raise the young. It all starts with what you plant, and you can create a habitat garden in your own backyard, at your office, at your church, or on the grounds of the local school. Entire communities are launching efforts to create monarch habitats. Learn how to create a wildlife-friendly garden.
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