Ongoing Safe Habitat for Salmon and Rainbow Trout in the American River

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If you find yourself along the Lower American River Parkway, especially near the Lower Sailor Bar and Nimbus Basin, you will notice many construction crews and piles of gravel. The Water Forum is currently working to create habitat for native chinook salmon and rainbow trout as they prepare to return to the area for their annual migration. The organization started projects like this in 2008 and improves the habitats almost every year. Projects are needed to improve fish spawning grounds and improve habitat for rearing juveniles. Thousands of tons of gravel are sorted and specially selected for the habitat, with the aim that it is the right size for the two fish to move around with their tails. Crews from the Sacramento Department of Public Utilities are carrying out preparatory work six days a week, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. It started in early August and will end in late September, just in time for the species to call the Lower American River home. “Normally our fall run chinook would start arriving in the river sometimes as early as August, but in reality their peak spawning time is in late October and early December,” said Erica Bishop, head of the habitat project for the Water Forum, told KCRA 3. Although salmon and rainbow trout have been in the area for millennia, human activity has impacted their migration. “We made a lot of changes to the watershed,” Bishop said. “We mined gold and gravel and built dams. Over time, fish habitat and fish populations are degrading.” That’s where this work comes in, and the Water Forum says it works. After the 2019 project, over 1,7000 nests have been discovered at Lower Sailor Bar. Last year, despite the drought, 30% of rainbow trout spawning occurred at another nearby site. This project receives state and federal funding, with assistance from the City of Sacramento and Sacramento County Regional Parks.

If you find yourself along the Lower American River Parkway, especially near the Lower Sailor Bar and Nimbus Basin, you will notice many construction crews and piles of gravel.

The Water Forum is currently working to create habitat for native Chinook Salmon and Rainbow Trout as they prepare to return to the area for their annual migration.

The organization started projects like this in 2008 and improves the habitats almost every year. Projects are needed to improve fish spawning grounds and improve habitat for rearing juveniles.

Thousands of tons of gravel are sorted and specially selected for the habitat, with the aim that it is the right size for the two fish to move around with their tails.

Crews from the Sacramento Department of Utilities are performing preparatory work six days a week, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

It started in early August and will end in late September, just in time for the species to settle in the lower US River.

“Normally, our fall chinook salmon would start arriving in the river sometimes as early as August, but their peak spawning time is in late October and early December,” said Erica Bishop, project manager. habitat for the Water Forum. KCRA 3.

Although salmon and rainbow trout have been in the area for millennia, human activity has impacted their migration.

“We made a lot of changes to the watershed,” Bishop said. “We mined gold and gravel and built dams. Over time, fish habitat and fish populations are degrading.”

That’s where this work comes in, and the Water Forum says it works. After the 2019 project, over 1,7000 nests were found at Lower Sailor Bar.

Last year, despite the drought, 30% of rainbow trout spawning occurred at another nearby site.

This project receives state and federal funding, with assistance from the City of Sacramento and Sacramento County Regional Parks.

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