The North Country organization is working to save monarch butterflies from extinction

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The monarch butterfly is becoming increasingly difficult to spot around the world after being one of the most recognizable and well-known butterflies on the planet. Recently, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, better known as name of ICUN, has listed migrating insects as an endangered species. “Less rain, more drought conditions temper milkweed growth and monarchs, they depend on this plant,” said Martha Van der Voort, program coordinator, Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center. “If we lose that to drought and higher temperatures, we put people at risk.” Scientists estimate that the population of monarch butterflies is rapidly declining. Martha Van der Voort runs the Butterfly House at Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center. She and her team aim to preserve monarchs by educating visitors about the challenges the population faces. “The most important thing is education, and by bringing native species into this very small, intimate and quiet environment, we are able to engage people with the diversity of life and show them the diversity of butterflies and butterflies. moths that live in the Adirondacks,” said Van der Voort. The butterfly house works closely with researchers who track and help butterflies at all stages of their life cycle. The group is even participating in an international effort, tagging nearly 200 monarch butterflies every year in hopes of learning more about their migratory paths.” Every day we put new milkweed in the tanks and this one has seven caterpillars and all of them are waiting for one to have made their pupae “, said Alison Lamb, student and coordinator of Butterfly House. Lamb said that anyone can help preserve the butterfly population by simply planting milkweed in their garden. not. “Even if it’s just in our corner, we can make a difference,” Lamb said. At this time, the United States has yet to declare the monarch butterfly an endangered species. Van der Voort says the IUCN’s decision to place the species on its list should start conversations globally and foster new ways to preserve the population.

The monarch butterfly is becoming increasingly difficult to spot around the world after being one of the most recognizable and well-known butterflies on the planet.

Recently, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, better known as ICUN, classified migratory insects as endangered species.

“Less rain, more drought conditions slow down the growth of milkweed and monarchs, they depend on this plant,” said Martha Van der Voort, program coordinator, Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center. “If we lose that to drought and higher temperatures, we put people at risk.”

Scientists estimate that the population of monarch butterflies is rapidly declining.

Martha Van der Voort runs the Butterfly House at Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretation Center.

She and her team aim to preserve monarchs by educating visitors about the challenges the population faces.

“The most important thing is education, and by bringing native species into this very small, intimate and quiet environment, we are able to engage people with the diversity of life and show them the diversity of butterflies and moths that live in the Adirondacks,” says Van der Voort.

The butterfly house works closely with researchers who follow and help butterflies at all stages of their life cycle.

The group even participates in an international effort, tagging nearly 200 monarch butterflies each year in hopes of learning more about their migratory routes.

“Every day we put new milkweed in the bins and this one has seven caterpillars and all of them are waiting for one to pupate,” said Alison Lamb, student and coordinator of Butterfly House.

Lamb said anyone can help preserve the butterfly population by simply planting milkweed in their garden.

“Even if it’s just in our corner, we can make a difference,” Lamb said.

At this time, the United States has yet to declare the monarch butterfly an endangered species.

Van der Voort says the IUCN’s decision to place the species on its list should start conversations globally and foster new ways to preserve the population.

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